Solution Manual for a Guidance Approach for the Encouraging Classroom 6th Edition by Dan Gartrell

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Link full download:https://findtestbanks.com/download/solution-manual-for-a-guidance-approach-for-the-encouraging-classroom-6th-edition-by-dan-gartrell/ Link download free sample:https://findtestbanks.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/01/Solution-Manual-for-A-Guidance-Approach-for-the-Encouraging-Classroom-6th-edition-by-Dan-Gartrell.pdf Language: English ISBN-10: 1133938930 ISBN-13: 9781133938934 Solution manual for a guidance approach for the encouraging classroom pdf Solution manual for a guidance approach for the encouraging classroom 6th edition pdf a guidance approach for the encouraging classroom 6th edition pdf download Solution manual a guidance approach for the encouraging classroom 6th edition ebook Solution manual
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  1 © 2014 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. Chapter 2  –   Child Development and Guidance OVERVIEW Chapter Two explores child development theories of the last 70 years and discusses the relation of each to guidance principles. The developmental theories are those of Piaget, Vygotsky, Erikson, Gardner, and Goleman. An overview of important findings from brain research and attachment theory, and the implications for guidance of each is provided. The section on Cultural Responsiveness explores how guidance relates to healthy development in a diverse society. The concluding section on Family Partnerships examines how the teacher creates a climate for partnerships with families. GUIDING QUESTIONS 1.    How do Piaget’s ideas provide a foundation for the study of child   development? 2.    How do Vygotsky’s ideas describe the adult’s role in guiding   development? 3.   Why is Erikson’s work a link between child development and guidance in the  classroom? 4.    How does Gardner’s theory of multiple intelligences support the guidance  approach? 5.    How does the concept of emotional intelligence define the central guidance issue? 6.   What are the implications of brain development for guiding personal development? 7.   Cultural Responsiveness: Why is guidance important for healthy development in a diverse Solution manual for A Guidance Approach for the Encouraging Classroom 6th Edition by Dan Gartrell   2 © 2014 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. society? 8.   Family Partnerships: How does the teacher create a climate for partnerships with families?  3 © 2014 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. Key Concepts    Attachment theory    Brain elasticity    Brain neural architecture    Cognitive dissonance    Conditional acceptance    Developmental egocentrism    Disequilibrium    Emotional intelligence (EI)    Equilibrium    Executive function    Microculture    Multiage classrooms    Multiple intelligences (MI)     Neuroscience    Peer scaffolding    Personal development    Private speech    Prosocial acts    Scaffolding    Separation anxiety    Zone of proximal development NAEYC STANDARDS o  Standard 1. Promoting Child Development and Learning o  Standard 2. Building Family and Community Relationships o  Standard 4. Using Developmentally Effective Approaches DISCUSSION QUESTIONS 1.    How do Piaget’s ideas provide a foundation for the study of child development and  guidance? The writings of Piaget document that children interpret experiences differently over time and that their interpretations conform to the stage of development they are in. For teaching to be effective, it must accommodate the child’s developmental level, base of experience, active learning nature, limited social perspective, and developmental egotism. For Piaget autonomy, or  4 © 2014 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. ethical and intelligent decision making, is the purpose of education. Guidance in the encouraging classroom is the teaching approach that leads children to develop autonomy.  2.    How do Vygotsky’s ideas describe the adult’s role in guiding   development? Vygotsky studied the learning process of the child and concluded that the role of others is central to it. In any act of learning, the child has a zone of proximal development, which is the  psychological difference between what the child can learn on her own and what she can learn with the help of a more capable other. Scaffolding, or sensitive interaction, guides the child through the zone. The child uses private speech, later internalized as conscious thought, to solve learning problems and self-regulate  behavior. An interpretation of Vygotsky’s work is that guidance is the scaffolding process by which children learn the skills of social and emotional  problem solving.  3.   Why is  Erikson’s  work a link between child development and guidance in the  classroom? Erikson theorized that all humans go through critical periods, or stages, in each of which they face a central life conflict. Young children pass through four: During the first critical period of trust versus mistrust, the infant tries to develop feelings of basic trust in her world. During the second, autonomy versus shame and doubt, the toddler begins to develop a sense of identity  —   hopefully with the encouragement of reliable adult relationships. During the third period of initiative and belonging versus guilt and alienation, preschoolers need support in creative activities and social interactions, through which they can positively define themselves. During the primary years, the critical issue is industry versus inferiority. Through each of the critical  periods, the approach that encourages both productive learning and positive feelings about oneself as a learner is guidance.  4.    How does Gardner’s theory of multiple intelligences support the guidance  approach? Gardner is among a growing number of psychologists who have debunked the idea that intelligence is a single entity, determined by heredity and fixed for life. Gardner’s concept of eight multiple intelligences are intended to change how we look at child development, education, and social policies regarding mental abilities. To respond to the eight intelligences in the classroom, curriculum, teaching practices, and assessment methods need to be opened up and
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