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Caroline Zackerman Opposing Interpretations of CO2 Levels The Scripps CO2 program, working through the Scripps Institute of Oceanography, records data at the Mauna Loa Observatory in Hawaii. This program focuses on CO2 concentrations, both in the atmosphere and seawater. Beginning in 1956 with the work of Charles David Keeling, the atmospheric levels of CO2 Mauna Loa have been recorded into the present day. The data of atmospheric CO2 is collected through the flask process, a simple yet
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  Caroline Zackerman Opposing Interpretations of CO 2 Levels The Scripps CO 2  program, working through the Scripps Institute of Oceanography, records data at the Mauna Loa Observatory in Hawaii. This program focuses on CO 2 concentrations, both in the atmosphere and seawater. Beginning in 1956 with the work of Charles David Keeling, the atmospheric levels of CO 2 Mauna Loa have been recorded into the  present day. The data of atmospheric CO 2 is collected through the flask process, a simple yet effective way of measuring. Large glass flasks, commonly referred to as Keeling flasks, are fitted with valves. The flasks are pointed towards the ocean and the valves are opened. When the flasks are full they are shipped to the Scripps Institution of Oceanography CO 2  program  where the CO 2 and isotopes are quantified. This is performed with a mass spectrometer, forming a beam of ions. A magnetic field is used to register the way isotopes reflecting, allowing them to be quantified. Using this process, the CO 2  levels have been recorded monthly for sixty years. This evidence displays a level of 317.69 ppm of CO 2  in 1960. The recorded levels have increased steadily, reaching 325.24 ppm in 1970, 338.6 ppm in 1980, 353.71 ppm in 1990, 369.61 ppm in 2000, and 405.84 ppm in 2017. The collected evidence very clearly displays the rising CO 2 emissions. The levels are reaching all-time highs, and growing at faster rates than ever recorded. The increased atmospheric CO 2 must be interpreted as a cause of climate change and global warming. CO 2 is a greenhouse gas which traps the heat energy from the sun, resulting in overall higher temperatures. As CO 2  began to increase rapidly, global temperatures did as well. These two values are increasing at alarmingly similar rates. This evidence can also be interpreted as a result of human activity. Prior to the Industrial Revolution, and the widespread use of factories and manufacturing, CO 2 levels were 35% lower than amounts recorded in the present day. Recently, human activity has allowed for great atmospheric CO 2 , as the research displays. This study displays the current danger presented to our planet. The rising CO 2  levels are manmade, the consequence of unchecked human activity. The modern world relies heavily on manufactured goods, which all involve industrial processes. Increased factory and automobile use are contributing to this. These processes emit waste CO 2 into the atmosphere at alarming rates. Consequences are apparent, such as steadily rising temperatures and unclean air quality. An increase in global temperatures as a result of CO 2  presents many dangers. The melting of  polar ice caps, rising sea levels, harming agriculture, and the endangerment of animals are just some of the dangers. In order to reduce the emissions of CO 2  we must take serious actions. Society, and by relying on green energy sources such as solar or wind, can limit the output of. In all aspects of life, on small scales in the home, or on large scales in factories and plants, greener energy can and should be utilize. Our culture’s dependence on consumer goods, often harming the environment in their production, can be limited if we make simple lifestyle adjustments. Citation: C. D. Keeling, S. C. Piper, R. B. Bacastow, M. Wahlen, T. P. Whorf, M. Heimann, and H. A. Meijer, Exchanges of atmospheric CO 2  and 13 CO 2  with the terrestrial  biosphere and oceans from 1978 to 2000. I. Global aspects, SIO Reference Series, No. 01-06, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, San Diego, 88 pages, 2001.    
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